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What should be included in a War of 1812 social studies lesson plan for the Battle of Detroit?

War of 1812 Differentiated Instruction Lesson Plan

War of 1812 Differentiated Instruction Lesson Plan

The Battle of Detroit was one of the first battles in the War of 1812. When teaching a social studies lesson plan on the War of 1812 and the Battle of Detroit, information has to be simplified for some students yet enriched for others to accomplish the ideal differentiated instruction goal. One way a teacher can differentiate instruction is to develop two different slides for the Battle of Detroit. If a co-teacher is available, allow them to teach one part of the class and the core teacher should teach the other. Create 2-3 different note sheets to help different ability levels. If a co-teacher isn’t available allow advanced students or students who already know what the Battle of Detroit is to read and take notes on their own ability level while you teach the rest of the class. Another option is to allow one section to view their level of the PowerPoint slides on their own using an in class computer or at home if given as homework. For more information on how to differentiate instruction for a War of 1812 social studies lesson plan, click here.

How can you put the Battle of Detroit into note form?

Below are two different versions of notes for the Battle of Detroit which is part of my War of 1812 social studies lesson plan.

Enriched:

  • Hull was ordered to invade Canada. To get ahead, he sent sick soldiers, heavy guns & official papers there. He didn’t know that the war had started. The boat was captured at Fort Malden. Britain now knew his plans.
  • Hull attacked Fort Malden on August 6 and 2 days later retreated across the Detroit River because Fort Mackinac fell and more British reinforcements were coming.
  • Hull sent 350-400 men to find a supply route that didn’t pass Fort Malden.
  • The British counterattacked and asked for Hull’s surrender which stated the British couldn’t control his Indians when the battle started. Hull refused and sent his militia to guard the town in case of an Indian attack. He left the river unguarded.
  • 700 Indians with Tecumseh & 700 British regulars crossed Detroit River.
  • Artillery killed 4 US officers. Hull raised the white flag and surrendered.
  • The British captured: 1,600 Ohio volunteers but later released, 582 American regulars, 33 cannons, 2,500 muskets and, the brig Adams (soon renamed Detroit).
  • The British suffered no casualties.
  • Hull and the regulars were taken to Quebec as POW’s.
  • Hull was court-martialed & sentenced to death, later pardoned by President Madison.

Basic Version:

  • Hull attacked Fort Malden on August 6 and 2 days later retreated across the Detroit River because Fort Mackinac fell and more British reinforcements were coming.
  • The British counterattacked and asked for Hull’s surrender because the British couldn’t control the Indians when the battle started. Hull didn’t and sent his militia to guard the town in case of an Indian attack. He left the river unguarded.
  • 700 Indians with Tecumseh & 700 British crossed Detroit River.
  • Artillery killed 4 US officers. Hull raised the white flag and surrendered.

Not going into as much detail allows the students that are receiving the basic version of notes time for repetition of the content. The enriched students should use more critical thinking skills. To differentiate instruction more, a teacher can bring in different learning styles or multiple intelligences for the repetition and critical thinking.

Other events in the War of 1812 that should be included in a social studies lesson plan on the War of 1812 are:

  • Fort Mackinac
  • Battle of Detroit
  • Constitution vs. Guerrire
  • Battle of Frenchtown
  • Battle of York
  • Battle of Lake Erie
  • Battle of Thames
  • Battle of Horseshoe Bend
  • Burning of Washington D.C.
  • Battle of Plattsburgh
  • Battle of Baltimore
  • Hartford Convention
  • Treaty of Ghent
  • Battle of New Orleans

This information can be seen in a differentiated instruction social studies lesson plan PowerPoint found at http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/War-of-1812-Differentiated-Instruction-PowerPoint-553613. The lesson plan can be found at: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/War-of-1812-Differentiated-Instruction-Lesson-Plan-553618.

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico (Connect with me on Linkedin.com)

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

How can you differentiate instruction for a War of 1812 lesson plan?

War of 1812 Differentiated Instruction Lesson Plan

War of 1812 Differentiated Instruction Lesson Plan

The War of 1812 is important to American History and yet it is covered only briefly in state curriculum. The War of 1812 had many causes, battles and events, and effects that should be included in a War of 1812 lesson plan.

All lesson plans should be introduced by vocabulary. Teachers can differentiate instruction for vocabulary by using a chart that allows students to repeat the content at least twice such as writing the definition and also using it to draw a picture.

The mini-lesson should include the causes, events and effects.

The causes of the War of 1812 include the following:

  • seizing of American ships
  • impressment of sailors
  • aiding attacks by Indians on settlers
  • refusal to remove troops in the Northwest Territory
  • War Hawks
  • desire to expand

Battles and events that should be included in a War of 1812 lesson plan are:

  • Fort Mackinac
  • Battle of Detroit
  • Constitution vs. Guerrire
  • Battle of Frenchtown
  • Battle of York
  • Battle of Lake Erie
  • Battle of Thames
  • Battle of Horseshoe Bend
  • Burning of Washington D.C.
  • Battle of Plattsburgh
  • Battle of Baltimore
  • Hartford Convention
  • Treaty of Ghent
  • Battle of New Orleans

The effects that should be included in a War of 1812 lesson plan include:

  • British recognizing boundaries and leaving Northwest Territory
  • national pride
  • increase in industry
  • disappearance of the Federalist party
  • Weakening of Native resistance

In order to differentiate instruction for a War of 1812 mini-lesson a teacher should give students a pretest or quiz to see what their background knowledge is or allow them to develop background knowledge through the use of a reading assignment differentiated by reading level. After reading teachers can give them a 5-10 question quiz to see what they have retained and where they should start for the differentiated instruction War of 1812 mini-lesson.

Teachers should try to reinforce the War of 1812 content by using different learning styles and Multiple Intelligences. They also should develop two War of 1812 mini-lessons. One with more detail and critical thinking for enrichment and the other just using the basic information which allows time for more repetition. This is most easily done with a co-teacher in the room. If a co-teacher is not available, a teacher could have the basic or enriched students go through the War of 1812 PowerPoint mini-lesson by themselves using a computer. Another option is to have the advanced students skip a mini-lesson altogether if they retained and took notes on the content during their reading assignment the day before. This will allow them to begin their differentiated instruction activity on their ability level or with their learning style preference.

If you don’t have time to develop a differentiated instruction War of 1812 mini-lesson using PowerPoint, I recommend looking here: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico. I specialize in social studies differentiated instruction. My War of 1812 PowerPoint is loaded with media links.

To close, create a graphic organizer on 3 ability levels and or a paragraph or an essay writing assignment.

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico (Connect with me on Linkedin.com)

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico