Tag Archives: linguistic intelligence

How do multiple intelligences work together?

Multiple Intelligences work together

Thomas Armstrong stresses in his book “Multiple Intelligences: In the Classroom”, that none of the multiple intelligences work alone in an individual except in the case of savants. People use multiple intelligences together to complete most tasks in life. This means that each person has multiple intelligences. One intelligence is usually stronger than another.

A good example of multiple intelligences working together is a person playing the game of soccer. It is obvious to most that know the origininal multiple intelligences by Dr. Howard Gardner that kicking, running and shooting is kinesthetic intelligence but lets look at the game a soccer in more detail to try to find more multiple intelligences being used. Players need to communicate to others on the field. The sweeper will direct the closest defender to push an offender to one side or another in order to trap them in a specific defendable position that is less likely to allow the offender to shoot at the goal. This is both logical intelligence as well as linguistic intelligence. It is logical intelligence because they need to think quickly about the best course of action. It is linguistic intelligence because their directions must be clear and concise in order to be effective. As the ball moves around the field, players need to position themselves in the propper areas on the field. They need to know what the best use of space is. They need to know where they should be before the pass is made. These needs of the game excercise both logical intelligence and spatial intelligence. Players also need to depend on others and trust their own skills so both interpersonal intelligence and intrapersonal intelligence are used. In order to play the game of soccer a player must use many multiple intelligences together.

So when teachers decide to differentiate instruction in the classroom, they should remember that activities can use many different multiple intelligences. If a teacher offers four options of activities, they should be able to offer at least 6 of the 7 original multiple intelligences to their students. Using multiple intelligences to differentiate instruction will increase the interest of students.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many multiple intelligence activities to differentiate instruction

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

How can teachers use linguistic intelligence to differentiate instruction for activities?

Differentiate Instruction using Linguistic Learning Activities

Most teachers use linguistic learning style activities but they might not realize that that’s what they are. There are many options of linguistic learning style activities. Anything to do with writing (persuasive writing, creative writing, or expository writing) is a linguistic learning activity. Teachers can differentiate instruction by using leveling or scaffolding with writing assignments by either using a leveled writing system or by providing scaffolded ability level questions.

Providing an option for students to both speak and write would be highly valued by those with the linguistic learning style. An example of this might be to create and perform a monologue, a skit or give a persuasive speech. Teachers can differentiate instruction by providing one of these linguistic learning style activities as one of the options you allow your students to choose from.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many linguistic learning style activities to help differentiate instruction

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

How can teachers use linguistic intelligence to differentiate instruction in a mini-lesson?

Differentiate Instruction with Linguistic Teaching Strategies

 

Linguistic learners have linguistic intelligence and need to use language to learn content. If teachers can deliver small content bites in about 2-3 minute intervals, a technique to differentiate instruction for the linguistic learners can be used. This linguistic teaching strategy is called wait-time extended. It calls for the teacher to allow their students to explain, in partners, what they have just learned. If you want to differentiate instruction more you can level or scaffold by providing questions at different ability levels.

Another linguistic teaching strategy would be encouraging classroom discussions especially ones that try to persuade other students to view something differently. If a teacher can bring in poetry, examples of primary text sources, or a mnemonic it would also interest linguistic learners.

Linguistic intelligence is one of the most valued intelligences in our culture. If students can’t communicate with others effectively, they may not be hired for a high paying job or hold valuable friendships. This type of learning style is tailored to by most teachers both consciously and unconsciously. It would, after all, be hard to teach without the use of language. It is also a very important intelligence to encourage your students to acquire through practice.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many linguistic learning activities and a leveled expository writing system.

 

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

What is Linguistic Intelligence?

Linguistic Intelligence

People with linguistic intelligence have the linguistic learning style. This is also called verbal learning style. Those with linguistic intelligence are intelligent with the use of language, oral and written. They learn best by writing, reading and speaking. People with linguistic intelligence or the linguistic learning style may acquire foreign languages easily.

Thomas Armstrong points out in his book “Multiple Intelligences: In the Classroom,” that people with linguistic intelligence are able to persuade others to carry out an action. Politicians value linguistic intelligence and showcase it during elections, when introducing policy and meeting with foreign diplomats.

Teachers showcase their linguistic intelligence by explaining content to their students and creating mnemonics to help their students remember. They write lesson plans and hold conferences. Both of these include the use of language.

People may exhibit only parts of linguistic intelligence. For instance some may be gifted speakers but poor at writing correct grammar and spelling. Thomas Armstrong believes that people can acquire different multiple intelligences overtime, if desired, usually through practice.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico offers many linguistic learning style activities and a leveled expository writing system

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

What are learning styles?

Learning Styles

Learning styles are based on the Multiple Intelligence Theory by Dr. Howard Gardner. Learning styles are the way a student learns based on their type of intelligence. It is their preferred way to receive information. Students respond differently to the way information is presented. When teaching a mini-lesson several learning styles should be used to help keep the attention and interest of more students in the class. The following go together:

  • Kinesthetic Intelligence – Physical learning style
  • Intrapersonal Intelligence – Solitary learning style
  • Interpersonal Intelligence – Social learning style
  • Logical-Mathematical Intelligence – Logical learning style
  • Linguistic Intelligence – Verbal learning style
  • Musical Intelligence – Aural learning style
  • Spatial Intelligence-Visual learning style

I created a multiple intelligence test that can help people find out their learning style. This is located at http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico for free. Finding out which types of learning styles students have can be useful to teachers who are planning a lesson. They are extremely helpful when differentiating instruction. I often go through and try to include as many of the learning styles in my mini-lessons and activity options for work sessions as I can. Learning styles keep my lessons interesting and meaningful to my students.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many activities that are based on different learning styles.

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico