Tag Archives: leveled expository writing system

Is a cause and effect essay an example of expository writing?

A cause and effect essay is an example of expository writing.

A cause and effect writing activity is an example of expository writing. This expository writing activity can be done in the form of a paragraph or an essay. Planning can easily be done and should be done before a cause and effect expository writing activity is begun. Planning works as a type of guide for the writer and focuses them on the content needed to accomplish the task. Two forms of planning that can be done for a cause and effect expository writing activity is a graphic organizer or an outline.

Some students may have trouble putting expository writing together in a paragraph or an essay form. One accommodation that can be used is an interactive expository writing system. If students have trouble with the process or are in the midst of learning the process of expository writing a leveled expository writing system can also be helpful. Leveled expository writing systems can help teachers differentiate instruction also by allowing students to write at different levels but use the same content.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Leveled-Expository-Writing-System-867302 offers a leveled expository writing system. Check it out!

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What teaching materials help teach the linguistic learning style student?

Linguistic Learning Style

Without the right teaching materials, those with the linguistic learning style might not learn. People with the linguistic learning style need to talk, listen, read and write. Make sure you have the following teaching materials available to help your students with the linguistic learning style be successful in your classroom.

  • books
  • audio recording devices
  • keyboard for computer
  • leveled expository writing system
  • interactive writing system on computer
  • audio books
  • audio of personal experiences for historical events
  • writing materials like paper and pencil
  • stamp sets

Having the right teaching materials can help the students with the linguistic learning style be successful in your classroom.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Leveled-Expository-Writing-System-867302 offers an expository writing system, linguistic learning style activities and much more available.

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Kasha Mastrodomenico

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How can teachers use linguistic intelligence to differentiate instruction for activities?

Differentiate Instruction using Linguistic Learning Activities

Most teachers use linguistic learning style activities but they might not realize that that’s what they are. There are many options of linguistic learning style activities. Anything to do with writing (persuasive writing, creative writing, or expository writing) is a linguistic learning activity. Teachers can differentiate instruction by using leveling or scaffolding with writing assignments by either using a leveled writing system or by providing scaffolded ability level questions.

Providing an option for students to both speak and write would be highly valued by those with the linguistic learning style. An example of this might be to create and perform a monologue, a skit or give a persuasive speech. Teachers can differentiate instruction by providing one of these linguistic learning style activities as one of the options you allow your students to choose from.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many linguistic learning style activities to help differentiate instruction

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Kasha Mastrodomenico

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What is Linguistic Intelligence?

Linguistic Intelligence

People with linguistic intelligence have the linguistic learning style. This is also called verbal learning style. Those with linguistic intelligence are intelligent with the use of language, oral and written. They learn best by writing, reading and speaking. People with linguistic intelligence or the linguistic learning style may acquire foreign languages easily.

Thomas Armstrong points out in his book “Multiple Intelligences: In the Classroom,” that people with linguistic intelligence are able to persuade others to carry out an action. Politicians value linguistic intelligence and showcase it during elections, when introducing policy and meeting with foreign diplomats.

Teachers showcase their linguistic intelligence by explaining content to their students and creating mnemonics to help their students remember. They write lesson plans and hold conferences. Both of these include the use of language.

People may exhibit only parts of linguistic intelligence. For instance some may be gifted speakers but poor at writing correct grammar and spelling. Thomas Armstrong believes that people can acquire different multiple intelligences overtime, if desired, usually through practice.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico offers many linguistic learning style activities and a leveled expository writing system

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Kasha Mastrodomenico

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How can you teach expository writing in paragraph form?

How to Teach Expository Writing

 

Expository writing can be taught through the use of ability levels. It is a great way to differentiate instruction also because many students will be on different writing levels at the same time but they can all still be writing about the same content. This is particularly useful for social studies and science teachers. Leveled writing is also called scaffolded writing and tiered writing. All of these terms are interchangeable.

When teaching how to write an expository paragraph, you first must look at the parts of the expository paragraph. Break this down for your students because expository writing can take on a formula-like appearance, this will help your SPED students especially.

1. Topic Sentence: States what the writer will be writing about without specifically saying “I am going to write about this”.

2. Facts: The facts support the topic sentence.

3. Elaboration: These support each of the facts provided in the paragraph and should be after each of them. They come in the form of examples and details. The more elaborations, the better the expository paragraph.

4. Concluding Sentence: This states what the expository paragraph was about without saying “this paragraph was about…”.

If students need more than this explanation an expository writing outline is always useful. It can keep them and their thoughts organized. I recommend that most SPED and ELL students use an outline before they write. It might look like this:

Expository Writing Paragraph

A. Topic Sentence:

B. Detail 1:

C. Elaboration of Detail 1:

D. Detail 2:

E. Elaboration of Detail 2:

F. Concluding Sentence:

The outline should be a fast exercise. This means that full sentences should not be used except maybe for the topic and concluding sentences in the expository paragraph. All of the other information should just be words or better, abbreviated words. The purpose of the outline is only to guide.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Leveled-Expository-Writing-System-867302 offers a leveled expository writing system using outlines. The teacher can create all of the writing levels they need in about 5 minutes.

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Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

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How Can I Differentiate Instruction for Classroom Activities?

There are a few different ways to differentiate activities:

  • Differentiate instruction using Multiple Intelligences
  • Differentiate instruction using leveling/scaffolding/tiering
  • Differentiate instruction by using remediation and enrichment

I recommend using multiple intelligences to differentiate activities. This allows the teacher to give their students many options of activities to do, based on their interests, using the same content. Students appreciate the opportunity to choose the activity they want to do. It helps give ownership to the project.

Leveling to differentiate instruction should be used when one project type needs to be completed. It can be tricky to do because you need to challenge and not just add busy work to the upper level. They will need additional critical thinking opportunities. Differentiating instruction or the lower ability level can also be tricky because you have to make sure they are getting just as much of the content as the middle and upper level groups.

The last option I’ve provided is to differentiate instruction by using remediation and enrichment. This can be used at the end of a unit or the end of each week. In my experience, it is impossible to do every day. It really works well when a co-teacher is involved. In order to do this you would need to do an evaluation of knowledge and those who have mastered the content do the enrichment activity and those who have not get the remediation.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers differentiated instruction activities, check it out!

Written by,
Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico