Tag Archives: kinesthetic learning style

How do kinesthetic teaching methods help to improve classroom behavior?

Kinesthetic Teaching Method

In my almost ten years of experience as a middle school teacher, I have found that one of the most effective preventative measures for decreasing discipline problems is increasing the use of kinesthetic teaching methods. I noticed that if I delivered small bites of content and then allowed for a thirty second movement or fast hands on example, which is a kinesthetic teaching method, it allowed the students to get out energy in a constructive manner and refocus. Due to the movement being part of instruction, they don’t get in trouble for moving around in their seat, getting up on their own or interrupting content delivery nearly as often. Kinesthetic teaching methods can really help with decreasing the need to refocus students with ADHD. Using kinesthetic teaching methods can help your class run smoothly.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many activities which use kinesthetic teaching methods

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

What are kinesthetic teaching methods?

Kinesthetic Teaching Method

There are many kinesthetic teaching methods. Anytime you can have students touch and feel something you are using a kinesthetic teaching method. Kinesthetic teaching methods have to do with movement. Role playing is a useful kinesthetic teaching method in subjects like Language Arts and Social Studies. If a teacher has a student in Science conducting an experiment, that is a kinesthetic teaching method. The same goes for building something like a historical puppet and then putting on a puppet show to demonstrate knowledge of the content. Building a robot in technology is also an example of a kinesthetic teaching method. Using kinesthetic teaching methods to differentiate instruction can be an easy and fun way to tweak mini-lessons and activities.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many activities based on kinesthetic teaching methods

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

Why should you use kinesthetic teaching methods?

Kinesthetic teaching methods can be very useful for students who learn best actively. One group of students that will almost always benefit from the use of kinesthetic teaching methods are students labeled ADHD. These students need breaks and have a ton of energy to burn. The more you can get kinesthteic learners to move, the better. Using kinesthetic teaching methods is a great way to differentiate instruction. When you differentiate instruction using kinesthetic teaching methods, you have more of a chance to reach more students.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico/Category/Activity-Templates-and-Rubrics offers many kinesthetic classroom activities. Check it out!

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico

How can you differentiate instruction with examples?

Use Multiple Intelligences to Differentiate Instruction for Content

Differentiation through the use of multiple examples goes along with the UDL (Universal Design for Learning Principles) idea of recognition learning. This is not a complex idea but it does take planning. The idea is that the more examples you give, and in different ways, the more students you will reach and the higher retention of the material they will have. Differentiated instruction can be done through the use of mutliple intelligences or ability levels.

One of my favorite lessons that I created that differentiates instruction in this way was about grids, latitude and longitude, etc.) I used multiple intelligences to differentiate. I first introduced the students to grids by providing the definitions that went along with grids and then I drew them on the board and had the students draw it next to the definition (linguistic, spatial). I also had them stand up for longitude and lay on the floor to explain latitude (kinesthetic). I showed them Santa Clause sliding on a longitude line from the North Pole to the South Pole and said “it’s a long way down to the South Pole” (spatial, linguistic). Next, I handed them a balloon and had them create a globe with a grid and had them label it (spatial, kinesthetic, intrapersonal). Then, they got a partner and they had to use the giant floor grid I had made with painters tape.  One person walked on the latitude line and the other walked on the longitude line and then met at the absolute location. They would then write down the item that was there (interpersonal, spatial, kinesthetic and logical). The last piece of the lesson was to use a map and as a small group find locations (logical, interpersonal, spatial). Notice that I used flexible grouping also in this lesson. There was whole class instruction, individual work, as well as partner work and small group work. I had so many different examples that every student had an understanding of not only what grids were but also how they worked. This lesson took two days. If you would like this lesson, click here.

In this lesson, the same information was provided in seven different ways to students. By providing multiple examples, differentiated instruction is accomplished by teachers.

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico helps middle school social studies teachers differentiate instruction.

 

Written by,

Kasha Mastrodomenico

http://www.socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

kasha@socialstudiesdifferentiatedinstruction.com

http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Kasha-Mastrodomenico